WHAT WE NEED


To face these global challenges, we need a global solution.

Justice is Global is building that solution, a visionary kind of

politics called Progressive Internationalism.

Progressive Internationalism targets economic and political

inequality directly with a bold policy agenda. This agenda includes

global wage standards, safer workplaces, investment in green

jobs, and an to end tax havens, sweatshops, and child labor.

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Global Wage Standards

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Safer Workplaces

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Investment in Green Jobs

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Public Infrastructure

Workers on strike blocking the entrance gate of Hi-P International factory yell slogans during a protest in Shanghai in December 2011. (Reuters/Carlos Barria)

Workers on strike blocking the entrance gate of Hi-P International factory yell slogans during a protest in Shanghai in December 2011. (Reuters/Carlos Barria)

By addressing the needs of working people struggling to get by,

these proposals will lead to a surge in consumer demand, and

spark unprecedented global economic growth. What’s more,

with a strong government and a movement of people around

the world, we’ll ensure that the growth is sustainable.

TAKE ACTION




IN THE FIGHT FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE

The international legislation we need to target inequality and build more equitable growth is not only possible,

some of it already exists. There already are minimum wage standards in trade deals like NAFTA, international institutions like

the United Nations have workplace standards on the books, and some multinational corporations like H&M

have agreed to codes of conduct in their supply chains.

What we need are stronger and more enforceable laws. We can get there with a

global movement for change.

 

WHAT DOES THIS SOLUTION LOOK LIKE?

The next video in our series dives into Progressive Internationalism, what it means, and how it

can transform our world. (And in case you missed them, check out videos 1 and 2 here.)

This all sounds great, but how do we do that?

The fourth and fifth videos in our series outline a strategy for change.